What Do You Want in Your Life?

Posted by on Oct 20, 2016 in Blog, Entrepreneurial Mindset, Freedom | 0 comments

What Do You Want in Your Life?

Tell me what you want, what you really, really want. – The Spice Girls

I was talking with a good friend and business colleague over dinner recently about being busy:  She has *no* free time (a hubby, two kids, a house, three cats, her own biz to run, schedules to manage, dishes to do); my time is also busy in a sort-of opposite way (I live alone with my cat and dog and also run my own biz, which means everything that happens around the house and in my biz / life is up to me to do). She and I both feel pinched for time and were looking around for some space, literally and mentally, from those things that are required just to keep life and business running on a daily basis. It’s as if there’s a giant mountain of stuff that must be regularly maintained that can sometimes feel like a heavy weight, and only when that work is complete is there time to do other things.

What do you want in your life?

I have another colleague who spent a year chasing after something she wanted, and as she got closer to getting it she realized that she didn’t need it – she already had it. The irony of the time spent and angst felt regarding how she’d fit this newly acquired thing into her life was a wake-up call, a chance to stop and take in what was already present, breathe it in.

What do you want in your life?

What do you want to do with your mind, with your work, with your life? What do you want for yourself? What mix of things does it make sense to fill your time with, what things will make a joyful contribution to your life and that of others?

You’ve no doubt heard that this is your life and you get to choose what to do with it. Sometimes that knowledge grants freedom, yet other times it may land as a heavy responsibility, pressure to make sure you’re spending your time wisely and not frittering it away, to make sure you’re not living the life equivalent of eating a bag of Doritos for dinner and tricking yourself into thinking you’ve been fed.

Filling your days with things that are meaningful to you can be a great contribution to you as well as others: happy humans beget other happy humans. Picking one or two things you want to make sure are part of your life, things that rise above the mountain of maintenance, and giving them space creates meaning. Allow yourself to putter around the garden, read a book, talk with a friend on the phone, write a hand-written letter. Developing these cornerstones of meaning will keep you going in the direction of knowing, and getting, what you want out of life.

What do you want in your life?

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